Energy Efficiency Standartization and Labelling

Energy efficiency requirements and labeling differ from country to country, as can be seen in the table below, using several Latin American countries as an example. The energy efficiency class is determined by the manufacturer or supplier of the product based on national standards, directives or technical regulations

Currently, in most developed countries, energy efficiency requirements and labeling of energy efficiency of household appliances are mandatory. The energy efficiency class is determined by the manufacturer or supplier of the product based on national standards, directives or technical regulations.


Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS)

Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS), also known as Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards (MEES), specify the minimum level of energy performance that appliances, lighting and electrical equipment (products) must meet or exceed before they can be offered for sale or used for commercial purposes. MEPS is usually entered in the mandatory state body for energy efficiency. 

How are MEPS measured?

MEPS requires the use of a specific testing procedure that determines how performance is measured. All information is collected through standardised testing under regulated conditions. Tests are carried out by the manufacturer in accordance with testing standard criteria. Following stringent testing, results are then declared and recorded. Independent checks are performed at random by the National Measurement and Regulation Office or the corresponding authority in each country. Any products found to vary from the declared rating may be removed from the market.

What are the benefits of MEPS?

Customers have more information than ever before on which to base their equipment decisions. Not only do they benefit from the knowledge that they are investing in environmentally friendly equipment offering advanced efficiency but also that potential running costs will be decreased.

It isn’t only customers that can enjoy the benefits of MEPS. Manufacturers are encouraged to develop products with advanced energy efficiency and continuously research potential improvements. This results in manufacturers being more environmentally aware, reducing Global Warming Potential (GWP) and lowering their carbon footprint.

Energy efficiency regulations for low voltage motors

In the recent past, various countries around the world have adopted their own energy efficiency standards. For example, in Europe they were guided by the CEMP standards, Russia was guided by GOST R 5167 2000, and the USA-by the EPAct standard.

In order to harmonize the energy efficiency requirements of electric motors, the International Energy Commission (IEC) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) have adopted a single standard IEC 60034-30. This standard classifies low-voltage asynchronous electric motors and unifies the requirements for their energy efficiency.

Energy efficiency classes

The IEC 60034-30 2008 standard defines three international energy efficiency classes:
IE1 – standard class (Standard Efficiency). Approximately equivalent to the European EFF2 class.
IE2 – high class (High Efficiency). Roughly equivalent to Class EFF1 and Class EPAct in the US for 60 Hz.
IE3-premium. Identical to the NEMA Premium class for 60 Hz.

The standard applies to almost all industrial three-phase asynchronous motors with a closed-loop rotor. The exception is engines:
powered by a frequency converter;
integrated into the design of equipment (such as a pump unit or fan) when independent testing is not possible.

Energy efficiency requirements and labeling differ from country to country, as can be seen in the table below, using several Latin American countries as an example. The energy efficiency class is determined by the manufacturer or supplier of the product based on national standards, directives or technical regulations

World Wide Bridge offers you its help to get an Energy efficiency certification and guides you through the following steps:

• tests;
• analysis of the received data;
• decision on certification;
• factory control;
• issuance of a permit for the use of an energy efficiency certification mark;
• market monitoring.

The stages listed above are carried out by the specialists of WWBridge, and the manufacturer only provides all the necessary information.

WWBridge will test your products, assign an energy efficiency class and draw up all the necessary documents in accordance with European regulations. Leave your request by email: [email protected]




Order the service

Name

E-mail for getting feedback


Your message